marcin sacha, photographer

  • The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it. 
  • The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.
  • Great talents are the most lovely and often the most dangerous fruits on the tree of humanity. They hang upon the most slender twigs that are easily snapped off.
  • The word “belief” is a difficult thing for me. I don’t believe. I must have a reason for a certain hypothesis. Either I know a thing, and then I know it – I don’t need to believe it.
  • As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being. 
  • The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances if there is any reaction, both are transformed.
  • There are as many nights as days, and the one is just as long as the other in the year’s course. Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word ‘happy’ would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness.
  • The pendulum of the mind oscillates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.
  • Your vision will become clear only when you look into your heart … Who looks outside, dreams. Who looks inside, awakens.
  • Knowledge rests not upon truth alone, but upon error also.

  • An understanding heart is everything in a teacher, and cannot be esteemed highly enough. One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feeling. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child.
  • That higher and “complete” man is begotten by the “unknown” father and born from Wisdom, and it is he who, in the figure of the puer aeternus—”vultu mutabilis albus et ater”—represents our totality, which transcends consciousness. It was this boy into whom Faust had to change, abandoning his inflated onesidedness which saw the devil only outside. Christ’s “Except ye become as little children” is a prefiguration of this, for in them the opposites lie close together; but what is meant is the boy who is born from the maturity of the adult man, and not the unconscious child we would like to remain.
  • One of the most difficult tasks humans can perform, however much others may despise it, is the invention of good games and it cannot be done by those out of touch with their instinctive selves.
  • An indisputable aspect of reality can falsify the actual truth in a most misleading way.
  • This grasping of the whole is obviously the aim of science as well, but it is a goal that necessarily lies very far off because science, whenever possible, proceeds experimentally and in all cases statistically. Experiment, however, consists in asking a definite question which excludes as far as possible anything disturbing and irrelevant. It makes conditions, imposes them on Nature, and in this way forces her to give an answer to a question devised by man. She is prevented from answering out of the fullness of her possibilities since these possibilities are restricted as far as practible. For this purpose there is created in the laboratory a situation which is artificially restricted to the question which compels Nature to give an unequivocal answer. The workings of Nature in her unrestricted wholeness are completely excluded. If we want to know what these workings are, we need a method of inquiry which imposes the fewest possible conditions, or if possible no conditions at all, and then leave Nature to answer out of her fullness.
  • It all depends on how we look at things, and not on how they are themselves.
  • (Just as a collection of masterpieces in a museum is an overwhelming experience) A collection of a hundred great brains makes one big fathead.
  • Religion is a defense against a religious experience.
  • Nothing worse could happen to one than to be completely understood.
  • The most intense conflicts, if overcome, leave behind a sense of security and calm that is not easily disturbed. It is just these intense conflicts and their conflagration which are needed to produce valuable and lasting results.

The decisive question for man is:

Is he related to something infinite or not? 

That is the telling question of his life.   

Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interests upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance…If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change. 

In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. 

In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship.

Carl Jung

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